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dc.contributor.advisorSlate, John R
dc.creatorMoss, Sheldon
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-01T20:53:43Z
dc.date.available2017-05-01T20:53:43Z
dc.date.created2017-05
dc.date.issued2017-03-15
dc.date.submittedMay 2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11875/2172
dc.description.abstractPurpose The purpose of this journal-ready dissertation was to examine the 1-year and 2-year persistence rates of Black students in Texas community colleges for the 2007-2008 through the 2014-2015 academic years. Specifically, the relationship of the 1-year and 2-year persistence rates for Black students as a function of their institutional status (i.e., staying or transferring) was analyzed. In addition, the graduation rates of Black and White students in Texas community colleges for the 2007-2008 through the 2015-2016 academic years were examined. The multiple academic years analyzed permitted a determination to the extent to which trends were present in 1-year persistence rates and 2-year persistence rates of Black students, and graduation rates of Black and White students in Texas community colleges. Method A causal-comparative research design was used for this study. Archival data from the Texas Higher Education Board Interactive Accountability System were downloaded and analyzed in each of the three empirical studies in this journal-ready dissertation. Specifically, archival data were obtained for the 2007-2008 through the 2014-2015 academic years for the 1-year persistence rates and for the 2007-2008 through the 2013-2014 academic years for the 2-year persistence rates of Black students in Texas community colleges. Graduation rate data for both Black and White students in Texas community colleges were obtained for the 2007-2008 through the 2015-2016 academic years. Findings Statistically significant differences were present in 4 of the 8 academic years for Black students’ 1-year persistence rates. Black students who stayed at the same community college had higher 1-year persistence rates than Black students who transferred to a different Texas community college. No statistically significant differences were present for Black students’ 2-year persistence rates. The 2-year persistence rates were very low for both Black students who stayed and for Black students who transferred to a different community college. Statistically significant differences were revealed in all 9 academic years between the graduation rates of Black and White students. White students had higher graduation rates than Black students in all 9 academic years. Implications for policy and recommendations for research were provided.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject1-Year Persistence Rates
dc.subject2-Year Persistence Rates
dc.subjectGraduation Rates
dc.subjectBlack
dc.subjectWhite
dc.subjectTexas
dc.subjectCommunity Colleges
dc.titleDifferences in Persistence and Graduation Rates of Black Students in Texas Community Colleges: A Multiyear, Statewide Study
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-05-01T20:55:50Z
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Leadership
thesis.degree.grantorSam Houston State University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHarris, Anthony J.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLunenburg, Frederick C.
dc.type.materialtext


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