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dc.contributor.advisorOnwuegbuzie, Anthony J.
dc.creatorWilcox, Rachael M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-26T18:03:17Z
dc.date.available2018-04-26T18:03:17Z
dc.date.created2018-05
dc.date.issued2018-04-10
dc.date.submittedMay 2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11875/2347
dc.description.abstractBusiness management scholars have examined aspects of organizational turnover for many years. There is general acknowledgement that the turnover process is complex and that most models leave significant variance unexplained. Additionally, scholars within the business management sector have stated that demographic variables (e.g., gender, race) have negative effects on turnover decisions. Within the sport industry, turnover research has been conducted only over the last 15 years; however, researchers have focused on the role of athletic coaches. Therefore, the first purpose of this study was to collect descriptive data to describe the demographic, professional, and educational characteristics of senior-level administrators within NCAA Division I FBS institutions. The second purpose was to examine the relationship among organizational outcomes (i.e., perceived career mobility [PCM], job satisfaction [JS] levels, and organizational turnover intentions [TO]) as a function of gender and ethnicity. This study offers a different perspective, that of senior-level athletic administrators. A quantitative survey was sent electronically to 1,231 senior-level athletic administrators across all 130 NCAA Division I FBS institutions. The survey contained four sections: (a) demographic information, (b) perceived career mobility scale, (c) job satisfaction, and (d) organizational turnover intentions. A total of 213 (17%) administrators responded. Demographic, educational, and professional profile characteristics are provided for NCAA Divisions I FBS senior-level athletic administrators. Furthermore, work-related outcome variables were examined as a function of gender and ethnicity, but no differences were reported. Additionally, gender and ethnicity interaction and main effects were examined with each work-related variable; however, no differences were discovered. Lastly, all variables (i.e., gender, ethnicity, PCM, and JS) were examined to determine if and to what extent each variable predicted TO. The findings indicated that the model was a good predictor of TO; moreover, JS explained the greatest degree of variance (i.e., 29%). Although findings did not reveal ethnic or gender differences, sport management scholars need to continue to expand the diversity-related research examining organizational outcomes within the athletic administration setting. Implications of the study are discussed in the context of curriculum design for program developers, future administrators hoping to work within intercollegiate athletics, and existing administrators working within the field.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectOrganizational turnover intentions
dc.subjectjob satisfaction
dc.subjectperceived career mobility
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjectethnicity
dc.subjectintercollegiate athletic administration
dc.subjectsenior administrators.
dc.titlePERCEIVED CAREER MOBILITY, JOB SATISFACTION, AND ORGANIZATIONAL TURNOVER INTENTIONS AMONG SENIOR ADMINISTRATORS AT NCAA DIVISION I FBS INSTITUTIONS AS A FUNCTION OF GENDER AND ETHNICITY
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-04-26T18:04:21Z
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Leadership
thesis.degree.grantorSam Houston State University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
dc.type.materialtext
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-8457-4914


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