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dc.contributorLEMIT
dc.contributor.authorTravis, Timothy, A.
dc.coverage.spatialTexas (United States, North and Central America : state)
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-30T14:25:39Z
dc.date.available2018-11-30T14:25:39Z
dc.date.created2018-09-01
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.other1829
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11875/2520
dc.descriptionThe United States entered the global war on terrorism on September 11, 2001. Since that time, millions of men and women have been deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan, and the horn of Africa in support of these combat operations. The veteran population in the United States is estimated to be 23,442,000 (National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics, 2008). The signature injuries of the global war on terrorism are post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury. A disproportionate percentage of returning veterans show signs of mental health disorders and/or substance abuse issues. These facts lead to many of our veterans entering into the criminal justice system. In order to address the needs of this unique community, the criminal justice system should facilitate veterans courts in its jurisdictions. These specialty courts, based on the DWI courts model, have lower recidivism rates than traditional courts, address the specific needs of each veteran, cost the taxpayer less money, and are much faster than traditional courts.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication-pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLaw Enforcement Management Institute of Texas (LEMIT)
dc.rightsProduced under the auspices of LEMIT. Quotations from this paper must be cited.
dc.subjectCourts of special jurisdiction
dc.subjectSpecial needs offenders--United States
dc.titleVeterans Courts
dc.type.materialText


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