Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHalmari, Helena
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-17T16:07:50Z
dc.date.available2021-11-17T16:07:50Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.identifier.citationHALMARI, HELENA. "Dividing the world: The dichotomous rhetoric of Ronald Reagan". Multilingua , vol. 12, no. 2, 1993, pp. 143-176. https://doi.org/10.1515/mult.1993.12.2.143en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11875/3213
dc.descriptionArticle originally published in Mutilingua in 1993en_US
dc.description.abstractThe language of politics often divides our world into two groups: those who share our own values, and those who supposedly oppose them. Ex-President Ronald Reagan was a master of the use of dichotomous language. His dichotomies were most clearly present in his descriptions of the U.S.- Soviet relations and the American and the Soviet military. The military build-up on the American side was exculpated, while the Soviet military build-up was vilified. With the change of the Soviet leadership in 1985, Reagan’s dichotomous thinking was challenged, and towards the end of Reagan’s presidency a slight change in his rhetoric can be noticed: he started to acknowledge a good side to the Soviet Union; however, there was often a tendency to denigrate the observed good. New areas of dichotomies arose, and vilification flourished till the end of his presidency.en_US
dc.publisherMultilinguaen_US
dc.subjectdichotomous languageen_US
dc.subjectpoliticen_US
dc.subjectvilificationen_US
dc.subjectRonald Reaganen_US
dc.titleDividing the world: The dichotomous rhetoric of Ronald Reaganen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record