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dc.contributor.authorHalmari, Helena
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-17T19:41:34Z
dc.date.available2021-11-17T19:41:34Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationHalmari, Helena and Adams, Robert. 2002. On the grammar and rhetoric of language mixing in Piers Plowman. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen CIII:1. 33–50.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11875/3216
dc.descriptionArticle originally published in Neuphilologische Mitteilungen in 2002.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn excerpt (1) below, the Dreamer of Langland’s Piers Plowman is expressing his dissatisfaction with friars; the passage is a typical example of what is often called “macaronic language” - a conventionalized style where two languages (here Middle English and Latin, or a few times French) are mixed in a happy combination for fairly well-documented rhetorical purposes. In line (4) the Latin prepositional phrase In fame et frigore conjoins the Middle English NP flappes of scourges; lines (5) and (12-13) exemplify full clauses, with Biblical associations, in Latin. That Langland’s virtuoso combining of Latin and English is a result of careful planning is shown by his occasional, extremely pointed metalinguistic comments,en_US
dc.publisherNeuphilologische Mitteilungenen_US
dc.subjectLanguage Mixingen_US
dc.subjectPiers Plowmanen_US
dc.subjectmacaronic languageen_US
dc.subjectmetalinguisticen_US
dc.titleOn the Grammar and Rhetoric of language mixing in Piers Plowmanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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