Differences in Mathematics and Reading College Readiness by Student Language Status and Economic Status: A Multiyear Statewide Investigation

Date

2024-05

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this journal-ready dissertation was to determine the degree to which differences were present for Emergent Bilingual students and non-EmergentBilingual students in their performance on the Algebra I and English I End-of-Course exams and the degree to which Emergent Bilingual students who were economically disadvantaged and Emergent Bilingual students who were not economically disadvantaged differed in their performance on the Algebra I End-of-Course exam. All three studies were based on the three Grade Level Performance standards: Approaches Grade Level, Meets Grade Level, and Masters Grade Level. Because several school years of data were analyzed, the extent to which trends were resent were also addressed. Method A causal-comparative research design (Johnson & Christensen, 2020) was used in this multi-year analysis. Analyzed were archival data from the Texas Education Agency Public Education Information Management System for the 2018-2019, 2020-2021, and 2021-2022 school years. Findings With respect to language status, non-Emergent Bilingual students outperformed Emergent Bilingual students on the Algebra I and English I End-of-Course exams in all three school years for all Grade Level Performance standards. On the Algebra I End-of-Course exam the widest gap between Emergent Bilingual students and non-Emergent Bilingual students who did not meet any Grade Level Performance standard was during the first post-pandemic year. On the English I End-of-Course exam the widest gap between Emergent Bilingual students and non-Emergent Bilingual student who did not meet any Grade Level Performance standard was during the pre-pandemic year and first post-pandemic year which was the exactly the same percentage points. Regarding economic status, Emergent Bilingual students who were economically disadvantaged outperformed Emergent Bilingual students who were not economically disadvantaged in four out of nine comparisons. On the Algebra I End-of-Course exam, a higher percentage of Emergent Bilingual students who were economically disadvantaged met a Grade Level Performance Standard in the pre-pandemic year and the second post-pandemic year. Of note was the very low percentage of Emergent Bilingual students who met any Grade Level standard on the English I End-of-Course exam.

Description

Keywords

Education, Bilingual and Multicultural

Citation