The relationship between female drug use and prostitution

dc.contributor.advisorBramlett, Billy W
dc.creatorWesterberg, James F.,1939-
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-28T21:35:44Z
dc.date.available2022-10-28T21:35:44Z
dc.date.submitted1974, August.
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to provide an analysis of the relationship which exists between the use of drugs and the practice of prostitution. This study sought to evaluate the hypothesis that a correlation exists between prostitution and drug use. In addition, it attempted an in-depth examination of a selected number of females at the Goree Unit for Women, Texas Department of Corrections, to determine what important factors precipitate the relationship. Specifically, this study sought to determine which phenomena occurred first, prostitution to drug use, and whether one was dependent on the other. Methods: data for this study were obtained through research of available information, and through the analysis of questionnaires given to a sample of female inmates at the Goree Unit for Women, Texas Department of Corrections. The initial sample consisted of 199 convicted female drug users. From this initial sample, it was determined that sixty-nine females that had been convicted of drug abuse offenses had also indicated prior prostitution practices. From this group, a final sample of thirty females was selected on a random basis. The procedure excluded those females convicted of drug abuse offenses with no recorded prior history of prostitution. Conclusions: 1. Curiosity regarding the possible effects, followed by a feeling that drug use would be worthwhile, are the most frequent reasons found for the initial use of drugs. 2. Marijuana and heroin are the most frequently used drugs. Fifty per cent of the respondents initially used marijuana before progressing to other drugs. In fifty-three per cent of the cases, either marijuana or heroin was used following the initial drug experience. 3. Whatever the progression of drugs used, eighty-six per cent of the sample reported that heroin ultimately became their drug of choice. 4. Respondents view the illegal use of all drugs, except marijuana, as detrimental to the welfare of a drug user. 5. Inmates feel that drug clinics are the most beneficial to drug users who voluntarily seek help with their drug problem. 6. Over eighty-six per cent of the drug offenders in this study agreed with the hypothesis that a woman who engages in prostitution will eventually use drugs. 7. Seventy-three per cent of the sample agreed that in order for a woman to support a drug habit she will eventually resort to prostitution. 8. No one specific factor appears to be responsible for a woman using drugs or entering into prostitution but rather many factors, such as the need for money, personal associations, and no legitimate employment.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11875/3797
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectProstitutes.
dc.subjectDrug abuse and sex.
dc.titleThe relationship between female drug use and prostitution
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.materialText
thesis.degree.departmentCriminal Justice
thesis.degree.grantorSam Houston State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Art

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