Analysis of United States foreign policy during the Dominican crisis of 1965:cohesion of dissension among the President, the Secretary of State, and the secondary state department officials on selectied issues

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1972

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Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze the hypothesis advanced by numerous political scientists that the President, Secretary of State, and the Secondary State Department officials usually agree on the basic fundamental foreign policy questions. There has been an analysis of the positions taken by the three actors over a period of time to ascertain whether or not they changed their positions on fundamental issues during the Dominican Crisis of 1965. Another purpose is to determine whether or not United States foreign policy in the crisis was a typical or an atypical exercise in United States foreign policy. Methods: The method of investigation in this thesis is content analysis. It is a research technique for the objective, systematic, and quantitative description of the content of communications. United States government documents were analyzed to quantify a possible cohesion or dissension in the diplomatic orientations among the three actors on certain questions: (1) United States perception of the nature of the Dominican revolution; (2) Attitude of the United States government toward the Dominican government forces and guerilla forces. Findings: 1. President Johnson apparently viewed unfavorably the Dominican crisis as a communist revolution and was consistent in his viewpoint over the long run. 2. Apparently, President Johnson was balanced in his viewpoint toward the guerilla and government forces and was consistent over a long period of time. 3. The Secretary of State apparently viewed unfavorably the Dominican revolution as communistic and was consistent in his viewpoint over a long period of time. 4. The Secretary of State’s viewpoint was apparently balanced toward the Dominican guerilla and government forces and was consistent over the long run. 5. The secondary State Department officials apparently viewed unfavorably the Dominican revolution as communistic and were consistent in their viewpoint over a long period of time. 6. The secondary State Department officials were balanced in their viewpoint toward the Dominican guerrilla and government forces and were consistent in their viewpoint over a long period of time.

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Keywords

political scientists, foreign policy questions, Dominican Crisis of 1965, viewpoint of government officals

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