EXPERIENCES OF US-BORN LONG-TERM EMERGENT BILINGUAL STUDENTS OF HISPANIC ORIGIN IN TITLE I SECONDARY SETTINGS

Date

2024-05

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Abstract

In this phenomenological study, the researcher examined the experiences of USborn Long-Term Emergent Bilingual (LTEB) students of Hispanic origin who tend to remain with EB designation after six or more years receiving services in an English as a second language program in high school. This study aimed to identify factors that can help reduce the achievement gap of US-born LTEBs of Hispanic origin. The context for this study was three Title I high schools in an urban school district in Texas. The data were collected using in-depth, semi-structured individual interviews. Participants comprised three language proficiency assessment committee (LPAC) administrators, two Emergent Bilingual (EB) specialists, and two teachers who worked with LTEBs. Four major themes emerged: students’ well-being, programming and funding, professional development, and additive practices. All participants concurred that addressing well-being was vital to help students remain engaged in school and reiterated the critical role intentional district and campus-level support structures play in meeting the needs of EB students and LTEBs. Recommendations included EB-focused professional development for all content-area teachers as well as family and EB students' empowerment initiatives that promote self-advocacy. The researcher discusses research gaps, practice recommendations, and implications for future research.

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Keywords

Education, Bilingual and Multicultural

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