Differences in Grade 4 Mathematics Performance Between Texas Charter Elementary Schools and Traditional Elementary Schools as a Function of Ethnicity/Race and by Poverty

Date

2021-03-25

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Abstract

The purpose of this journal-ready dissertation was to determine the degree to which differences were present in mathematics achievement between Grade 4 students enrolled in charter elementary schools and Grade 4 students enrolled in traditional elementary schools. In the first article, the extent to which differences existed in mathematics achievement between all Grade 4 students enrolled in charter elementary schools and traditional elementary schools in Texas was determined. In the second study, the degree to which differences were present in mathematics achievement between Grade 4 Black and Hispanic students enrolled in charter elementary schools and Black and Hispanic students enrolled in traditional elementary schools was addressed. In the third study, the extent to which differences were present in mathematics achievement in Grade 4 students who were economically disadvantaged and who were enrolled in charter elementary schools and students who were economically disadvantaged and who were enrolled in traditional elementary schools was examined. Specifically, the extent to which the differences in passing standards (i.e., Approaches Grade Level, Meets Grade Level, and Masters Grade Level) were present in Grade 4 STAAR Mathematics between students enrolled in charter elementary schools and students enrolled in traditional elementary schools was determined. Additionally, three years of data were analyzed to determine if a trend in the levels of passing standards (i.e., Approaches Grade Level, Meets Grade Level, and Masters Grade Level) in each school-type (i.e., charter and traditional) was present.

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State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness Performance Standards, Student achievement, Charter schools, Traditional schools, Mathematics, Black students, Hispanic students, Economically disadvantaged

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