Timing is Everything: State-by-State Analysis of the Collection of Lawfully Owed DNA from Offenders

Date

2023-05-01T06:00:00.000Z

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Abstract

The purpose of this thesis is to describe differences across states in the core elements of their statutes on the collection of DNA from suspects and convicted offenders and to analyze the influence of specific components of state statutes on the collection of lawfully owed DNA throughout the United States, the District of Columbia (D.C.), and the three united territories (Guam, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands). State legal data on the collection of DNA is coded for all 50 states, D.C. and three united territories, along with data on the total number of CODIS hits as of October of 2021. This thesis answers three research questions. What do state statutes require for the collection of lawfully owed DNA? The thesis answers this question with the systematic collection of data about state statutes and a descriptive analysis of the data. Second, do states enter fewer investigations aided into CODIS if their statute indicates DNA will be collected at both arrest and conviction? The hypothesis is that the collection of lawfully owed DNA by states at both arrest and conviction would have a negative relationship with the number of investigations aided as defined by the FBI in the National DNA Index System (NDIS). The study tests this relationship through an independent samples t-test analysis. Third, are aspects of state statutes related to the number of offender profiles within NDIS? The hypothesis is that the number of points at which lawfully owed DNA is collected during the conviction process would be correlated with the number of CODIS offender profiles. The thesis tests this relationship through an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test of five points in time. The results of these three analyses provide insights into the potential benefits of regulating components within state statutes. The study also presents policy recommendations that have the potential to reduce inconsistency with the collection of lawfully owed DNA.

Description

Keywords

Citation