THE MODERATING EFFECT OF PERSONALITY AND GENDER ON PSYCHOLOGICAL OUTCOMES AMONG AFRICAN AMERICANS WHO HAVE EXPERIENCED RACE-RELATED STRESS

Date

2021-08-01T05:00:00.000Z

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Abstract

Black/African Americans who experience race-related stress are more susceptible to suicidality. More research is needed to understand the strength of this relation and the other possible factors that influence this relation. Past research has noted moderating factors such as coping, religion, and social support on the association between race-related stress and suicidality; however, there are no research studies examining the direct relation of both gender and personality on this association, particularly in the Black/African American community. Therefore, using the Socio-Ecological Model as the theoretical framework, this study sought to determine the impact of personality traits and gender on the association between race-related stress, suicidal ideation, and correlates of suicide (i.e., depression, anxiety, and hopelessness). The current study consisted of 133 Black/African Americans in the Southeastern United States, aged 18-59 years (M = 34.01, SD = 11.856) with the majority being women (51.9%) and single (65.4 %). Linear multiple regression analyses explored the moderating effects of gender and personality on the association between race-related stress, suicide, and suicide correlates (i.e., depression, anxiety, hopelessness). A significant moderating effect for personality and gender was found with depression and hopelessness, particularly for the Neuroticism personality factor, such that for men with higher levels of Neuroticism there was a positive association between race-related stress and the psychological outcomes. Further discussion of the findings and their implications can be found in the discussion section.

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Psychology, Clinical, Psychology, Personality

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