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dc.contributorLEMIT
dc.contributor.authorBranson, Joseph
dc.coverage.spatialTexas (United States, North and Central America : state)
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-12T15:49:24Z
dc.date.available2019-08-12T15:49:24Z
dc.date.created2019-06-01
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.other1858
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11875/2635
dc.descriptionWith ever-increasing demands being placed on law-enforcement officers and administrators, animal control divisions, commonly attached to police departments, are left without the attention and oversight they need to succeed. Placing animal control under the command of police administrators creates several issues for both the police and animal control officers. Police departments should not be in command of animal control and animal shelters. Police personnel lack the training and knowledge required to provide oversight to animal control, and it is increasingly difficult for police administrators to allocate enough time for proper supervision of shelters and animal control officers. Placing animal control and animal shelters under police administration is an outdated and unnecessary undertaking.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication-pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLaw Enforcement Management Institute of Texas (LEMIT)
dc.rightsProduced under the auspices of LEMIT. Quotations from this paper must be cited.
dc.subjectAnimal Welfare
dc.titleLaw Enforcement and Animal Control
dc.type.materialText


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